President Barack Obama points out Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario at Champions of Change event.

US President Barack Obama points out Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario (2nd L) as he delivers remarks at a Champions of Change event. | Source: MANDEL NGAN / Getty

Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario is stepping down after six years, according to a statement from the company.

“CEO Rose Marcario is leaving Patagonia after six years on the job, effective June 12, the company said in a statement. A replacement has not yet been named. Chief Operating Officer Doug Freeman will run the business as the company searches for a successor,” Bloomberg reports, adding “The new CEO will inherit a business that like most other non-essential retailers has largely gone dark due to Covid-19. Patagonia was one of the earliest stores to close its doors in March and is being cautious with its reopening plan.”

The site goes on to say that under Marcario, Patagonia “significantly amped up its activism and advocated for environmental issues ranging from climate change to protecting public lands. She also started Patagonia’s food business, venture fund and a digital hub for environmental activists.”

Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario at Champions of Change event with President Barack Obama.

Source: MANDEL NGAN / Getty

As May came to a close, Patagonia also expressed support for the Black community.

“We join with those who call out the name of George Floyd in sorrow and anger against the systemic racism that pervades our land. We stand in solidarity with African Americans and people of color, including those among our colleagues and their families. And we call on business to work with government and civil society to address racism. We know that we have work to do,” the clothing company said, in part. See their full statement below.

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We join with those who call out the name of George Floyd in sorrow and anger against the systemic racism that pervades our land. We stand in solidarity with African Americans and people of color, including those among our colleagues and their families. And we call on business to work with government and civil society to address racism. We know that we have work to do. ⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Environmental and social justice are inextricably linked and we all must address the intersection of people and planet and the core inequalities in our society. Patagonia remains deeply committed to saving our planet and a world where everyone has access to clean air, water, land, and a healthy community. Since 2016, we have dedicated over $4M to increasing support and attention to grassroots groups in frontline communities who are often hardest hit not only by racial injustice, but also the climate crisis, environmental pollution, and now the COVID-19 pandemic. Today, we are making a $100,000 donation to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Tomorrow, and in the weeks to follow, we will intensify our efforts to ensure that voting, the most basic civil right we have, is safe for everyone. ⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Through our Action Works platform, we also encourage our community to learn more about the environmental justice and voter-turnout groups Patagonia supports. And we will continue engaging with our partners and grantees in communities of color to learn how we can best support them. We are committing to not only being more aware of racism and social injustice all around us but actively doing something about it. ⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Nonviolent activism pushes progress. We have work to do.⁠⠀ #BlackLivesMatter

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We are wishing Marcario all the best. Stay tuned!

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