Black Panther 2

Source: Marvel Studios / Marvel Studios

The release of Black Panther is sure to be a Black-ass occasion. In honor of the year’s most anticipated film dropping during Black History Month, we’ve rounded up five Black-ass graphic novels to read before setting off to Wakanda.

Black History in Its Own Words by Ron Wimberly

The Rundown:

Black history gets told through the words of those who made it.

What Folks Say:

“[This book] presents quotes of dozens of black luminaries with portraits & illustrations by Ronald Wimberly. Featuring the memorable words and depictions of Angela Davis, Jean-Michael Basquiat, Kanye West, Zadie Smith, Ice Cube, Dave Chappelle, James Baldwin, Spike Lee and more.” — Amazon

The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks

The Rundown:

The powerful story of 369th infantry regiment comes back to life.

What Folks Say:

“Shattering…A visceral evocation of the horrors of trench warfare…A sharp reminder that venerating volunteer troops for their service is an ideal that has not always been a reality.” — Washington Post

Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation by Octavia E. Butler

The Rundown:

A tribute to Octavia Butler’s masterpiece.

What Folks Say:

“Kindred is a perfect candidate for the graphic-novel medium—Damian Duffy’s taut adaptation and John Jennings’s tense, electric renderings vibrate throughout, pacing and containing, then pushing every ounce of discomfort to the forefront. Comics and science fiction exploit their greatest shared strength by illuminating the mundane that surrounds us, allowing any reader to critique and process our world with new vision.”— Nate Powell Eisner, award winning and New York Times bestselling graphic novelist

Malcolm X: A Graphic Biography by Andrew Helfer

The Rundown:

The riveting story of Malcolm X gets a graphic treatment.

What Folks Say:

“Helfer and DuBurke have created an evocative and studied look at not only Malcolm X but the racial conflict that defined and shaped him.”— Publishers Weekly

 

Nat Turner by Kyle Baker

The Rundown:

A vivid recounting of Nat Turner and the slave rebellion that changed everything.

What Folks Say:

“Baker presents a cinematic reel that integrates beautiful sepia-toned panels, newspaper headlines in period font, photographs, and historical texts; most heavily drawn from is the recorded Confessions of Nat Turner. . .The ideas brought forth here are sure to ignite debate and discussion, and this book would be a most interesting companion to other studies of antebellum history such as Edward P. Jones’s The Known World.” — School Library Journal

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