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Ja Rule has been cleared of any wrongdoing for his involvement in hyping up the Fyre Festival.

According to New York Daily News, Judge Kevin Castel decided Ja Rule’s exaggeration of what fans would receive when purchasing tickets to the Fyre Festival ahead of its epic fail did not mean Ja was aware those who planned to attend were going to get burned.

“Ja Rule was a participant in organizing or promoting a large-scale event. There is no assertion that the festival when first conceived or introduced to the public was intended not to go forward or that the defendant intended not to perform by organizing the advertised amenities and accommodation,” Castel wrote.

Ryan Smith, Ja Rule’s attorney said, “Mr. Atkins [Ja Rule] is thankful for today’s ruling and for the Court’s time and attention. Justice was done today,”

Ja Rule took to Instagram to hold TMZ accountable for their false reporting. Apparently TMZ reported that Ja Rule “came up short” in his attempt to kill the Fyre Festival lawsuit, when Ja has text message proof of a TMZ reporter congratulating him on the victory and asking for a comment.

 

The Fyre Festival was supposed to be a luxury music festival. The event was promoted on social media by influencers including billionaire Kendall Jenner, as well as many of whom did not originally disclose they had been paid to do so.

During the festival’s first weekend, the event had major problems ranging from issues with security, food, accommodation, and even artist attendance. The result was the festival being postponed indefinitely. As an effect of the postponement, the luxury villas and gourmet meals for which festival attendees paid thousands of dollars for were swapped for cold lunches and FEMA tents as their accommodation.

The CEO of Fyre Media, Billy McFarland, is now serving a six-year prison bid for his role in the “Fyre Fraud.” McFarland pleaded guilty to two counts of wire fraud in Federal Court in Manhattan and admitted to using fake documents to attract investors to put more than $26 million into his company.