Former President Obama Participates In Virtual Town Hall On Policing In Wake Of George Floyd Death

Source: Handout / Getty

President Barack Obama has been very vocal during these last couple of months. During a time when a nation needs a leader, they’d typically turn to their president. But the current President of the United States of America is a total joke, so his predecessor has to do the job he is unfit to do.

Obama most recently has voiced his support for the rising demands of police reform, he did this in what was his first public appearance since the killing of George Floyd, which ignited nationwide protests that took place in all 50 states.

Obama virtually attended a round-table event with former Attorney General Eric Holder, along with activists from Minneapolis and Obama’s non-profit, My Brother’s Keeper Alliance.

In Obama’s statement, he drove home the fact that he is incredibly optimistic about the future of the country– despite the massive civil unrest going on.

“For those who have been talking about protest, just remember that this country was founded on protest — it is called the American Revolution… Every step of progress in this country, every expansion of freedom, every expression of our deepest ideals have been won through efforts that made the status quo uncomfortable.”

Obama said, when speaking to all people of color, “I want you to know that you matter. Your lives matter. Your dreams matter.”

Obama then turned his words and focus to police forces and urged them to commit to total reform. “We need to be clear about where change is going to happen.” Obama continued to speak on the arguments of which is more effective, voting or protests and politics or civil disobedience, saying that this is not an either-or scenario. “We have to translate that into practical solutions and laws that can be implemented.”

He also urged lawmakers to review police forces and commit to reform. “We need to be clear about where change is going to happen.” Obama addressed arguments of “voting versus protests” and “politics versus civil disobedience,” saying that these aren’t mutually exclusive ideas, both must happen. “We have to translate that into practical solutions and laws that can be implemented.”

You can watch the full round table below. Obama addresses the civil unrest around the 7:30 mark.